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O'Shaughnessy's
Journal of the California Cannabis Research Medical Group

 

Current Issue:

Spring 2006

This issue has been delivered for web publishing and will be posted during the week of May 28, 2006.

 

Past Issues:

Autumn 2005

Winter/Spring 2005

Autumn 2004

Spring 2004

Summer 2003

Funding for O'Shaughnessy's is provided by readers like you. Please consider making a donation to help defray publishing and distribution.

Statement of Purpose:

The California Cannabis Research Medical Group was founded by Tod Mikuriya, MD, to enable doctors who have been monitoring their patients’ cannabis use to share data and observations.
Cannabis is not a conventional medicine at this time, and O’Shaugnessy’s —published by the CCRMG— is not starting out as a conventional journal.

Our primary goals are the same as the stated goals of any reputable scientific publication: to bring out findings that are accurate, duplicable, and useful to the community at large. But in order to do this, we have to pursue parallel goals such as removing the impediments to clinical research created by Prohibition, and educating our colleagues, co-workers and patients as we educate ourselves about the medical uses of cannabis.

Some 50,000 Californians have obtained doctors’ approvals to use cannabis since Prop 215 made it legal in November, 1996. (This estimate is based on records kept by cannabis clubs and an extrapolation with Oregon, which has a state program that maintains a registry of patients authorized by physicians to use cannabis.)

Legalization under Section 11362.5 of the state’s Health & Safety Code created a fearful dilemma for California doctors, because cannabis remained illegal under federal law. Most doctors, having had no training on the subject in medical school, having no guidance with respect to dose, modes of delivery, range of effects, counter-indications, etc., have been understandably reluctant to sanction their patients’ use of cannabis.

A December 1996 threat from federal officials to deny prescription-writing privileges to California doctors who recommend marijuana has achieved some of its inhibiting purpose, although the federal courts ruled that it violated the First Amendment.

Doctors who have approved cannabis use by their patients fall into three broad categories: 1) Willing specialists — mainly oncologists and AIDS specialists who, having been educated by their patients over the years, understood the utility of cannabis and felt confident about approving its use; 2) Willing general practitioners who have written approvals for a few of their patients who have grave illnesses or otherwise undeniable needs; and 3) Cannabis specialists, who recognize its versatility, are convinced of its relative benignity, and keep abreast of the literature with respect to mechanism-of-action, clinical trials in Europe, etc. CCRMG members are in this subset. Collectively, they have issued most of the estimated 50,000 approvals granted to date.
CCRMG members each have their own intake questionnaires and record-keeping systems, and have been slow to agree on a uniform “face sheet” for their patients’ charts (partly because they’ve had to spend so much of their time, energy, and resources responding to legal threats to themselves and their patients).

Six-and-a-half years after the legalization of marijuana for medical use, serious data sharing is only just beginning; we’re still in the borderland between anecdotal evidence and verifiable data. Nevertheless, the information garnered to date seems worth collating and sharing with other doctors and healthcare workers, as well as patients, caregivers, and concerned citizens.

Editor: Fred Gardner, journal<AT>ccrmg.org

 

Be sure to visit the William B. O'Shaughnessy Archive

 

 

O'Shaughnessy's
O'Shaughnessy's is the journal of the CCRMG. Our primary goals are the same as the stated goals of any reputable scientific publication: to bring out findings that are accurate, duplicable, and useful to the community at large. But in order to do this, we have to pursue parallel goals such as removing the impediments to clinical research created by Prohibition, and educating our colleagues, co-workers and patients as we educate ourselves about the medical uses of cannabis. Read O'Shaughnessy's Online
 
SCC
The Society of Cannabis Clinicians (SCC) was formed in the Autumn of 2004 by the member physicians of CCRMG to aid in the promulgation of voluntary standards for clinicians engaged in the recommendation and approval of cannabis under California law (HSC §11362.5).

As the collaborative effort continues to move closer to issueing guidelines, this site serves as a public venue for airing and discussing these guidelines.

Visit the SCC Site for more information.